Reverse Culture Shock
Uncategorized

Reverse Culture Shock

Reverse Culture Shock

As my first group of interns prepare to return back to the UK, one topic of conversation that has been heavily discussed is reverse culture shock.  As someone who has travelled a fair amount, I am well acquainted with this confusing feeling.  However, compared to regular culture shock, the reverse feeling felt upon return to one’s home is rarely discussed.  This blog will explain the sensation and hopefully give you some tips on how to prepare and combat reverse culture shock.

So, what is reverse culture shock?

Reverse culture shock is pretty much exactly what it states on the tin; it’s a feeling of shock, isolation, or unfamiliarity when you return home after living abroad for a considerable period of time.  It can even sometimes be worse than culture shock felt when first experiencing life in a new place, because you assume that since you are returning somewhere full of family and friends the change will be easier to deal with.  However, a lot of people often explain this transition to be more difficult as they are returning to the same place, but not returning as the same person.  No one at home completely understands the journey you have been on, and you miss the people you shared that journey with.  People at home will often be interested in hearing tales from your time abroad right after your return, but they might become disinterested after a few days or weeks, and this can lead to feelings of frustration and isolation as no one understands the life you lived abroad.

Accept your feelings

Although you may feel down or upset for a period of time after your return, the most important thing is to understand why you are feeling that way.  Hopefully this blog will help you to understand this feeling and be aware of reverse culture shock, so if you do experience it you at least know what is happening.  There’s always so much focus on preparing to travel somewhere, but hardly ever preparation for returning home.  It always feels rushed and last minute as you try and pack in as much fun as possible in the last few days in your temporary home.  So, it’s easy to forget to remind yourself that you may find moving home more difficult than moving away.  But accept whatever feelings come, and don’t feel bad about feeling bad!  It’s totally normal and little can be done to prevent missing your time abroad, because let’s be honest, living everyday as an adventure is of course going to be more fun that the daily life you’re used to back home.  But you will slowly adjust back to life at home, and everyday will get easier, just don’t be surprised if sometimes you feel sad or lonely for a day or two.

Stay calm

A major factor which plays into reverse culture shock is often the fact that relatives and friends may not be as interested in hearing about your time abroad as you had hoped.  After a few days, they may grow tired of hearing you talk about your time away but try not to be frustrated or offended.  Try your best to put yourself in their position.  While you have been away discovering new food and making new friends, most people at home have been living their same daily lives and may not want to hear how good a time you have had compared to them.  In addition, it’s important to remember that the world at home did not stand still when you were away.  People change, situations change, and the place you return to may not feel exactly as it did when you initially left.  Be patient, and things will begin to feel normal again.

Stay connected

Thankfully today it is possible to stay in touch with people you met on your travels through the magic of social media. Ease of communication is one pro of the ever-evolving social media used constantly in today’s world. If you ever feel down or alone, give your friends from your internship or your travels a message on Facebook (or WeChat!) and see if they’re feeling the same way. It’s important to recognise that these feelings are totally normal, and most people will be going through the same confusing emotions, so talk about them, or just have a catch up and see how everyone is adapting to life back at home!

Keep busy

Similar to regular culture shock, one of the best ways to overcome reverse culture shock is keeping busy. Don’t let yourself spend days on end sitting in your room reminiscing about your time abroad, this will probably only make adjusting to life back at home even harder. Make plans with friends, cook dinner for your family, go for a run, start to learn a new language, basically anything that keeps your mind occupied and helps you keep developing! When you were abroad, you probably did your best to use your time wisely and fit as many activities in as possible. Take this mentality back home and live each day to it’s fullest. Is there somewhere nearby your hometown where you’ve never explored? Is there a museum exhibit on display nearby? Is there a coffee shop with great cake that you’ve not eaten in a while? Even though it may not be as exciting as living abroad in a brand-new environment, you can still find hidden gems in your own back garden, so go out and explore!

Plan the future!

From my personal experience, the best way to combat reverse culture shock is to plan something exciting in the near future.  For me, this is usually a short trip away from home.  I’m lucky to live in Europe where travel prices are relatively low, especially in winter, so planning spontaneous trips doesn’t need to break the bank.  However, if travel prices are too high, plan a day trip instead!  Or a party, a picnic, a sports game, a bike ride…  anything that you can look forward to and focus energy on planning, so you can look forward to new adventures rather than becoming sad reminiscing over memories of the past.

Hopefully this blog has helped you to learn about the reality of reverse culture shock and will help you to prepare for your return back home.

International Experience
Internship experience, Practical Advice

Why International Experience Is Important

International experience is important because it not only pushes you out of your comfort zone; it also exposes you to new challenges, new experiences and new cultures. It is an opportunity for you to broaden your horizons and open your mind to different ways of working and thinking.  Wherever you are in the world,  it is important to try and understand how things work and why they are a certain way, for example in Vietnam, the war has had a massive impact on the way things are in Vietnam compared to other countries such as Thailand and Malaysia. Furthermore international experience also helps you to understand yourself more too. It’s a way for you to figure out how you handle certain situations, especially when in a new culture and new country. It is particularly a big challenge when you have moved to another country alone too. It may be hard to find your feet, but once you do, it can be very rewarding.

Trying new foods, meeting new people from different cultures and making friends from all around the world alongside making connections with a variety of people from the business world through networking are all part of the fun when you move to the other side of the world. All of these things not only benefit you personally, but also when you come to apply for a job in the future, all of these experiences and challenges are things you can talk about in an interview.

When it comes to employment back in your home country or anywhere in the world, international experience is one thing that can really make you stand out from the crowd as it exhibits a variety of skills. As well as this, moving from your home country to the other side of the world displays a global perspective; for example it shows drive, determination and flexibility as well as that you are an open minded individual. It takes a lot for anyone to move from the comfort of their home country to another country to work, which not everyone is capable of doing.

Some other skills you may display to a prospective employer on your CV, when you have ‘upped sticks’ and taken the plunge to work overseas could include:

  • Problem solving skills
  • Self sufficiency
  • Perspective (gained or renewed)
  • Initiative

Moving to Ho Chi Minh City was my first experience of living alone in a foreign country, away from the people closest to me and honestly it has been the most amazing and rewarding experience. I have learnt so much through my internship and along the way learnt far more than I ever imagined I would about myself too. There will be days where everything feels great, waking up to the sun and warm weather every day is amazing as well as never knowing what you may see on the back of a scooter! And then some days there will be times you wish you could just have a roast dinner with your parents. But even in the low moments, your friends and family are just a phone call away and the most important thing is also knowing how to deal with those moments and remembering that feeling home sick really is okay! There will also always be someone around who will be there to support you too. It is also important to remember to never give up on such an amazing  and epic journey and learning experience.

Learning doesn’t just stop at learning new skills in a job but also learning about who you are – there is no better way than to push yourself and to figure out who you are, than by going out of your comfort zone.

The world is such a fascinating place, and wherever you go, there will always be something new to experience. Having volunteered in Africa and currently interning in Vietnam, I have learnt and experienced a lot of new things I wouldn’t have discovered otherwise. I have learnt how to handle certain situations that push me out of my comfort zone and  also actually realised how much I can handle (I really exceeded my expectation of myself).

Fod from Vietnammm
Daily Life in Vietnam, Practical Advice, Vietnam Basics, Vietnamese Culture, Vietnamese Food

How to use Vietnammm

Vietnammm is a great app to use if you want to get food but don’t have the energy to go and actually step out of your door and get food. It’s easy to use and there are a wide range of dishes available. Vietnammm is the perfect app to use if you have had a long day, feeling a little lazy or just want to eat in the comfort of your own home. The app is available in both Vietnamese and English.

 

Vietnammm

 

1. Firstly, select your location. For example city – Ho Chi Minh City followed by district – District 2 . You can also let the app automatically find your location.

2. You have the option to choose whether you want to pick up your order or have it delivered to your door.

3. A selection of restaurants and eateries will appear on the screen and it will show you the estimated delivery time as well as the price of the delivery.

4. You can search for different types of cuisine, if you are looking for something specific.

5. You can also use the map tool to see the location of the restaurant, in comparison to where your location is. You can find this by looking for the pin point icon.

6. There is also a sort function so that you can arrange the selection of restaurants you see in order of price, distance and best match.

7. Once you have selected the restaurant you want to order from, Vietnammm will show the menu, deals available as well as reviews. You will also see that some of the restaurants also have a delivery charge or a minimum spend.

8. If you want to add any extras to your order then make sure you click the plus button to add the extras to your basket.

9. Once you have finished making your selections, click on the shopping bag icon and head to the check out. Here you will see a breakdown of costs, for example the price of each item of food, as well as extras and the delivery cost followed by the total order cost at the bottom.

10. You can then select your payment method. There is a choice of cash, card and PayPal.

11. If you select cash, make sure that you select the right amount so that the driver can bring the correct amount of change for you. After this, click order and pay. Your order will then be processed.

12. Make sure that you use your Vietnamese phone number so that the driver can contact you to let you know when your food is ready and waiting for you.

13. Once the order has been confirmed you can also track your order using the tracking map, if you want to keep an eye on it.

14. An estimated delivery time is also usually provided.

15. Enjoy your meal!

A video version of this is also available here: Video Guide

You can also read more of our blogs here

Grab App
Daily Life in Vietnam, Internship experience, Uncategorized, Vietnam Basics, Vietnamese Culture

How to use Grab

When you first arrive in Vietnam it can be a little daunting, especially when you first encounter the masses of motorbikes and crazy traffic. Ho Chi Minh City is still in the process of constructing its metro system, so you may have asked yourself the important question – how am I going to get around? Of course there is the bus system, although this can be a little tricky to navigate when in a new country and city. But fear not, the Grab app, which is very similar to Uber will likely become your best friend whilst you are here. In this post we will explain how to use Grab. Making it much easier for you to get around the city and enable you to enjoy your time exploring and get the most out of your time here.

The main purpose of Grab is for rides whether it is a bike or a car, you will also see on there that there is also a variety of other services provided, for example ordering food and topping up your phone as well as earning rewards. Be sure to check for rewards when you use the app, as you never know what you may find.
The app has a location tracker of the bike driver, so that you can see the progress of the driver.

Step by Step:

1. The first step is to insert your Vietnamese sim into your phone, ensuring you have data. Then install the Grab application onto your mobile device, entering your contact details to create an account. For example, you will be first required to enter your Vietnamese phone number, but there is also the option to sign in using Facebook.

2. There is an option to add your card details, you can do this if you wish although be aware of any bank charges that may occur every time you use your card to pay for a ride. Cashless is also an option although it depends on what you’re comfortable with.

3. You can then select the service you want from the homepage, for example choosing a Grab Bike.

4. You can save locations on the app so it would be a good idea to input and save your ‘home’ address and ‘work’ address so that you can easily access them (this also saves time), especially if you forget the address of a name of a building for example.

5. When you want to book a ride, enter the location you want to be picked up from, this will be a blue pinpoint. Grab can detect your location but sometimes its incorrect so be sure to double check that the pin point is in the place you want to be picked up from. If it is incorrect you can change it by readjusting the pin point or typing in an address.

6. Once you have done this, you then enter the destination you wish to be taken to – the marker will be red when you search for the location. You can then confirm the details once you’re happy and the app will search for a driver nearby and confirm the price.

7. After the ride is booked and confirmed, you will then be given the registration number information – make sure you check the number plate on the app and on the motorbike both match before getting on the bike.

8. Always wear a helmet, sometimes you will need to adjust the helmet so that it sits comfortably and securely on your head.

You can also watch a video version of this here

Grab App

Daily Life in Vietnam, Doing Business in Vietnam, Internship experience, Practical Advice, Vietnam Basics

How to top up your phone in Vietnam

Doing your first phone top-up in Vietnam can be a little bit confusing if you have never done it before, especially if you are used to pay monthly back at home. In this post, there will be a step by step ‘how to’ guide to make your first top-up simplified. It is also important to note that new sims may need to be registered using some form of identity for example a passport, in order to top up. You can take this into the provider’s store, for example to Viettel, where they will happily assist you with this.

1. You can add credit to your phone to one of the phone stores, the 3 main network providers in Vietnam are:
– Viettel
– Mobifone
– Vinaphone
Alternatively, you can also go into a convenience store such as Circle K, Seven Eleven or Family Mart to top up your phone.

2. Before topping up your phone, you can check the balance by dialling 101*# then call. It will then show your current balance on the screen.

3. Tell the cashier which network you are with and the amount you would like to top up. Usually, 100,000 VND (Approx. £3.40) is enough and this should last you 30 days. The cashier will then give you a receipt.

4. Once you have been given your receipt, you will find a unique 12 digit number at the bottom of the receipt. You will need the serial number.

Mobile Phone Top Up

5. In order to apply the top up to your phone, you will need to dial *100* followed by the 12 digit number then hash (#) and then press call.

6. You will then receive a notification or text that will confirm the top up was successful

7. It’s best the double check that the top up has gone through by calling *101*#

8. If you want to renew your data package, you will need to compose a new message and send a specific code to a certain number, depending on the network you are on will depend on the code and the number.

9. For example, V90 followed by sending to the number 191

10. You can also watch the video version of this here

Daily Life in Vietnam, Internship experience, Practical Advice

Sport in Saigon

If you’re looking to get involved in sports during your internship there is plenty you can do. Sport is becoming increasingly popular amongst locals and with some beautiful trail runs available across the Vietnamese countryside – running is the sport that is taking up fans rapidly. Not only that, but with the large foreign community flocking to Vietnam there are lots of other international sports making their mark here through clubs.

Running

At first sight you may think Saigon isn’t so well suited for running, with motorbikes everywhere, quite heavy pollution and not many pavements it does make it a challenge. However, the longer you spend here you start to find some nice quieter spots to get your morning or evening jog in. Some spaces you may enjoy running are: the newly developed area near Sala Stadium, Vinhomes Central Park, Hoa Lu Stadium, along the side of the canals.

Runclub.vn arrange group runs almost every day of the week at different areas in the city. They accommodate all levels and quite frequently are able to get discounts for marathons and trail races across the country. Saigon Hash House Harriers – Hashing exists across the globe and Saigon is no different. Every Sunday this ‘drinking club with a running problem’ head outside of Saigon for a run following a trail of paper or flour before finishing off the evening with a ‘circle’ and ‘on-on’.

Swimming

If you like training in the pool then there are quite a few options across the city, but it is worth checking opening times as some of them can be quite strange and open for 2 hour chunks throughout the day! This blog has a good variety of different pools for training and relaxing around the city.

Yet Kieu Aquatics Centre is a great 50m & 25m lane pool that is kept clean. It is VND 20,000 / VND 25,000 (on weekends) per go and early in the morning is not too busy. The changing rooms aren’t great, so perhaps be best to head home for a proper shower and change afterwards.

Saigon Swim Squad meets once a week for an hour at AIS in Thao Dien and costs VND 150,000 per session – all profits going towards charity. The class is focused on improving technique and fitness for freestyle so you need to be a pretty competent swimmer, but it is nice to train as a group.

Cycling

Cycling is becoming increasingly popular in Vietnam – but this is one you do have to get up early for to either avoid the traffic or the heat. Some bike shops such as Trisport and RidePlus may be able to rent out bikes for a couple of hours and they do frequently arrange group rides for the weekends. Trisport also arrange group triathlon practices in Sala a couple of times a month.

Clubs

Below is a list of different clubs that get together to train in Saigon. They may stop training during the holidays, or reduce sessions, so it might be worth just checking their Facebook groups or pages for up to date information or dropping them a message. Some have membership fees, some have a training cost per session, but it would be possible to discuss with them something that works for both you and the club, so that you are still contributing to training costs.

The Vietnam Swans – Aussie Rules Football Club for both male and female.
Saigon Geckos – Rugby Union Football Club for both male and female. They also arrange weekly touch rugby sessions.
Saigon Gaels GAA – Gaelic Football Club for both male and female. Their season starts again in August as they prepare for the Asian Gaelic Games.
Saigon Shooters – Mixed netball club that has social netball on a Monday night; they run two friendly leagues throughout the year.
Saigon Women’s Football Club
Saigon Australian Cricket Club

These are just a few, but you can find a lot more on Facebook if you search what you are interested in.

Other sports & gyms
If you are wanting to play some badminton or tennis then it is easy enough to book a court at one of the sport centres. There are also options for climbing, ice skating, yoga around the city, so something for everyone.

Gyms are cropping up across the city – the main chain is California Fitness but this is quite expensive. There are smaller options around the city that can easily be found using Google Maps including some that specialise in cross fit, or martial arts.

Hope this information helps you stay fit in Saigon and keep doing the sports that you enjoy!

Internvietnam - Transferwise
Practical Advice, Uncategorized

Transferwise – comment faire un virement international ?

N’hésitez pas à cliquer sur les images pour les aggrandir

Etape 1 : Sur la page d’accueil, cliquez sur “sign up” pour créer un compte
Etape 2 : Entrez vos informations personnelles pour créer un compte
Etape 3 : Entrez le montant comme indiqué sur votre facture en GBP – le montant débité de votre compte en Euros apparaitra de lui même
Etape 4 : Entrez vos informations personnelles comme inscrites sur votre carte bleue
Etape 5 : Entrez les coordonnées d’InternChina comme indiquée sur votre facture
Etape 6 : Vérifiez que le montant versé à InternChina est bien en GBP et qu’il est identique à celui indiqué sur votre facture
Etape 7  : Choisissez votre moyen de paiement – si vous choisissez d’utiliser votre carte bancaire, le transfert est presque immédiat c’est ce que nous recommandons. Si vous préférez utiliser un transfert via votre banque c’est possible en choisissant ‘bank transfer’ cependant toutes les banques n’autorisent pas les virements internationaux
  • Comparativement à un virement bancaire, le processus est beaucoup plus rapide. Généralement, tout ce dont vous avez besoin est le nom du destinataire, son adresse e-mail, son code IBAN ou son numéro de compte. Les frais sont clairement affichés, et vous pouvez les comparer avec les frais bancaires avant chaque transfert. Je ne me soucie même plus de comparer puisque l’économie par rapport à n’importe quelle banque a toujours été énorme pour moi.
  • En tant qu’entreprise britannique dont les programmes se déroulent en Asie, nous envoyons beaucoup d’argent en Chine et au Vietnam afin de financer nos programmes. Nous utilisons TransferWise pour ce processus, ce qui nous fait gagner du temps et de l’argent.
  • Pour nos participants, ils ont la possibilité d’envoyer de l’argent depuis ou vers leur pays d’origine en Asie. De plus il est possible de nous verser des arrhes si vous êtes basés en dehors du Royaume-Uni. Afin d’utiliser TransferWise, vous pouvez utiliser votre carte de crédit ou de débit pour effectuer un paiement ou transférer des fonds de votre banque.
  • Concernant les paiements internationaux, nous recommandons toujours d’utiliser TransferWise. Les paiements sont moins chers qu’avec les banques. En effet le taux de change réel – que vous pouvez voir sur Google – est toujours celui utilisé. De plus, les frais facturés sont toujours minimes. Ils sont également sécurisés et approuvés par plus de 2 millions de personnes à travers le monde. Vous pouvez vous inscrire ici.
Quelques conseils et rappels :
  • Merci de nous communiquer votre choix d’option de paiement
  • Merci d’utilisez UNIQUEMENT la devise Livres Sterlings – British Pounds – GBP – £ pour effectuer vos paiements à InternChina
  • La caution de 200£ ajoutée au tarif de votre programme vous sera reversée à la fin de votre séjour si aucun dommage n’a été signalé dans votre logement

N’hésitez pas à nous contacter directement et nous essayerons de vous aider au mieux pour utiliser Transferwise !

Daily Life in Vietnam, Internship experience

On Reflection: Looking Back at My Experience Interning in Ho Chi Minh City

By: Jess Warren

So, you’re thinking about working in Vietnam? I’ve just come back from spending two months interning in Ho Chi Minh City for the expat-orientated magazine, AsiaLIFE, and it was one of the best ways I could have spent my summer. Instead of being sat at home, I was out gaining valuable experience in industry I’m looking to work in.

Working for a magazine for two months was also a pretty good way to see the city. Instead of being in the office nine-to-five each day, I was tasked with finding stories across the city, and interviewing interesting people, from business owners to government staff. I had the chance to work remotely, and was trusted to manage my time efficiently, and turn in the articles on time, without needing to be in the office. A pretty good way to grow my own time-management and organisational skills.

“Travelling across the city by bike is a fantastic opportunity.”

Living in Ho Chi Minh City is a bit of a whirlwind, the traffic is constant and chaotic, with bikes passing you by at every angle. If you’re up to it, travelling across the city via Grab (a ride hailing service for bikes) is a fantastic opportunity. Of course, take all the necessary safety precautions such as covering your legs and arms and wearing a better helmet than they provide. My employer gave me a helmet to use, and I would fully recommend making the minor investment.

The strangest thing about living abroad for two months was the considerably lower living cost, it actually turned out to be more expensive to buy western food items in a supermarket and cook at my apartment compared to eating lunch and dinner in small eateries and restaurants. This meant I had the opportunity to try out a variety of cuisine. Whilst you might think Vietnamese food is the only option, it’s far from the truth. In fact, Ho Chi Minh City has restaurants featuring every food from around the world, and done to a very high standard. At the end of my street, I had a pizza takeaway run by an Italian man from Naples. However Vietnamese food is incredibly fresh and delicious, so I would fully recommend.

“By embracing living abroad, I found so many more opportunities outside of my working day.”

The one thing that made my experience even better whilst living abroad was joining expat Facebook groups, and going to local events. I stumbled across a trendy arts café about five minutes from my apartment, where locals performed live music, stand-up comedy and there was even a magazine launch party there. By embracing living abroad, I found so many more opportunities outside of my working day. I joined a group and practised yoga in a local park situated on the riverbank, and I followed recommendations of places to see and go from the people I met. Instead of seeing your internship as a temporary ‘holiday’, I found the best way to view it was that I was living abroad in a city I would call home for two months.

Interested in applying for an internship just like Jess’? Then apply now! 

Daily Life in Vietnam, Internship experience, Practical Advice

Questions sur mon séjour au Vietnam – FAQs

Partez-vous bientôt au Vietnam ? Nous avons regroupé quelques réponses aux questions que vous pourriez vous poser ! 

Argent

  • La monnaie vietnamienne est le dong vietnamien (VND). Pour vérifier les taux de change, nous vous recommandons d’utiliser le site xe.com.
  • Vérifiez avec votre banque avant de partir si vous avez des frais de retrait ou paiement.
  • Il est facile d’échanger des euros au Vietnam. Nous vous conseillons donc d’emporter des Euros avec vous. Vous pouvez aussi partir avec un peu de monnaie locale pour votre arrivée.

Logement

  • Vous pouvez arriver 4 jours avant le début de votre stage – le jeudi – et partir de l’appartement 2 jours après la fin de votre stage – le dimanche.

Avion

  • Vous pouvez réserver vos billets d’avion dès que vous avez trouvé un stage et signé notre formulaire de réservation.
  • L’aéroport international de Tan Son Nhat est le seul aéroport de Hô Chi Minh – vous devrez donc arriver ici.
  • InternVietnam recommande d’utiliser notre partenaire officiel STA Travel pour réserver vos billets. Ce sont les leaders mondiaux dans l’organisation des vols pour le Vietnam pour les étudiants. Obtenez votre devis gratuit pour les vols internationaux requis directement ici.

Passport

  • Vous devez être munis d’un passport valable au minimum 6 mois après votre arrivée au Vietnam.
  • Votre passport doit contenir au minimum 2 pages blanches.
  • Il doit être en parfait état, ni taché ni déchiré.
  • Pensez à nous envoyer une copie de votre passport au plus vite. Pour que nous préparions les documents nécessaires à l’obtention de votre visa.

Visa

  • Nous vous donnerons tous les documents nécessaires à l’obtention de votre visa. Il vous faudra les emmener avec vous et remplir un formulaire.
  • Nous prenons en charge les frais liés à l’obtention du visa.
  • Vous obtiendrez votre visa à votre arrivée à l’aéroport. Il vous faudra être muni des documents fournis par notre équipe, le formulaire à remplir au préalable, deux photos d’identité , et de votre passport.
  • Notre équipe vous donnera plus d’informations 4 à 6 semaines avant votre arrivée.
  • Si le processus de demande de visa évolue nous vous tiendrons au courant.

Assurance

  • L’assurance santé et voyage est prise en charge par InternVietnam pour vous sur la durée de votre séjour.
  • Vous recevrez les documents sur l’assurance avant votre arrivée. N’hésitez pas à les réclamer si besoin.

Vaccins et médicaments

  • Aucun vaccin n’est obligatoire pour le Vietnam. Nous vous conseillons cependant de vérifier cela avec votre médecin avant de partir. Vous pouvez aussi vous rendre à l’hopital et prendre un rendez-vous avec le centre des vaccinations pour être sûr.
  • Vous pouvez trouver du paracétamol partout au Vietnam. Si vous avez des médicaments plus spécifiques, nous vous conseillons de partir avec un stock pour la durée de votre séjour.
  • En cas d’allergie ou de diabète, nous vous conseillons d’emporter 2 crayons à insuline ou EpiPen.

Valise

  • Copies de votre passport et documents nécessaires à l’obtention du visa dans votre bagage à main
  • Ordinateur
  • Adaptateurs pour les prises
  • Médicaments avec les ordonnances
  • Déodorant, désinfectant pour les mains et autres produits de toilettes
  • Pour les filles : des tampons qui sont difficiles à trouver à Ho Chi Minh
  • Pour les personnes de grande taille : emportez vos chaussures et vêtements. Vous risquez de ne pas trouver de chaussures ou vêtements à votre taille
  • Vêtements simples et formels pour votre stage
  • Un costume/tailleur/tenue classe pour un rendez-vous important ou une soirée importante
  • Vêtements de pluie et chaussures imperméables en cas de pluies intenses
  • Répulsif à insecte et crème solaire
  • Tongs ou claquette pour l’intérieur de votre logement
  • Vestes et pulls légers . En effet l’air conditionné peut être trop froid dans certains endroits
  • Masque anti pollution pour vos trajets en taxis
  • Serviettes de toilette

Téléphone et applications

  • Pensez à débloquer votre smartphone avant de venir. Sinon la carte sim que nous vous fournirons risque de ne pas fonctionner.
  • WhatsApp et Facebook seront les applications utilisées par notre équipe pour vous contacter durant votre séjour et stage.
  • Grab est l’application pour commander un taxi.
  • Vietnammm est une application pour commander à manger en ligne.
  • Xe Currency pour pouvoir convertir la monnaie.
  • Google translator ou un autre système de traduction.

Plus d’infos

  • Dans l’avion avant d’arriver il vous faudra renseigner votre adresse de résidence à Ho Chi Minh. Vous pouvez utiliser l’adresse de notre bureau. 94 Xuan Thuy, Thao Dien, District 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
  • N’oubliez pas de remplir vos documents pour l’obtention du visa avant de prendre l’avion. Ainsi en cas de questions nous serons donc en mesure de vous aider, sinon il sera trop tard.
Front of the Notre Dame Basilica
Vietnamese Culture

Top 10 Tourist Attractions – HCMC

Looking for something to do in Ho Chi Minh City? Well, you’ll find it pretty easy! It’s a city of contrasts, with the old mixing with the new in this wonderful melting pot of a place. It offers visitors a plethora of things to do; from its coffee shops, markets, cheap food and drink to its buzzing atmosphere – alive with the sounds of motorbikes (there are around 10 million in the city!) However, we’ve put together a list of the 10 best places to visit in HCMC to help you out!

 War Remnants Museum

Displays the brutal results of war on its civilian, including well publicized atrocities, that many westerners rarely hear about. The displays feature victims telling their stories of US military action. Many of the information about these atrocities are from US sources, including the infamous My Lai Massacre. This is a very important site to visit in HCMC if you wish to understand its history and how it came to be the place it is today.

Picture of the exterior of the War Remnants museum

Giac Lam Pagoda

The Buddhist temples has aspects of both Taoism and Confucianism in its design and Gives a great insight into Chinese influence on religion in Vietnam.

 

Reunification Palace

A window into the 1960s this historic government building has a solemn atmosphere as you walk around its quiet halls. Once home to the offices of the president of South Vietnam during the Vietnam war, it was designed by architect Ngô Viết Thụ and has some very interesting Architectural features.

Exterior of the Reunification Palace

 Jade Emperor Pagoda

This Taoist pagoda was built by Vietnam’s Chinese community in 1909. It is also known as ‘Fuhai Temple’ – Sea of ​​Luck Temple. This is a spectacular temple full of with beautiful statues depicting the gods and heroes of Taoist belief.

 

Phước_Hải_Tự

 

Fine Arts Museum

Ho Chi Minh City Museum of Fine Arts covers three buildings featuring Vietnamese silk paintings, sculptures and lacquer painting, as well as traditional woodcut paintings. It used to be the Villa home of the ‘Hua’ family but became a museum in 1987.

 

 

Antique Street

This street is just a short walk from the Fine Arts Museum. The art and antiques stores along this street are full of fun curios, but beware of fakes!

 

 

Phuoc An Hoi Quan Pagoda

 

 

The built in 1902 the temple is dedicated to Quan Cong as well as several other guardians to happiness and wealth. The temple is full of beautiful features including brass lanterns and coiled incense hanging from the roof beams as well as fine woodcarvings.

History Museum

Built in 1926 museum home to a collection of artefacts from across Vietnams history, from the Dong son civilisation to the modern Vietnam. For those interested in Vietnamese history the museum is definitely worth a visit.

 

Binh Tay Market

Binh Tay is the main market in the Cho Lon district of HCMC. This area is part of HCMC’s China town, which covers almost half of an entire district of the city. The market is a bustling lively place and expect to have a warm welcome when You got eat at one of the markets many street food vendors! It is also home to a fantastic outdoor Wet Market where you can buy fresh local seafood.

 Binh Tay Market

Notre- Dame Cathedral Basilica of Saigon

 

Completed in 1883, Notre Dame Cathedral lies right in the heart of Ho Chi Minh City’s government quarter. It still contains some of its original stained glass and with its 40m-high square towers the cathedral is a striking contrast to other styles you will see in HCMC.

 

 

Front of the Notre Dame Basilica

 

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